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December 1, 2010
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Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL
Shutter Speed
1/640 second
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F/5.6
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28 mm
ISO Speed
100
Date Taken
Jul 8, 2007, 9:34:57 AM
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Adobe Photoshop Elements 9.0 Windows
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4mm
×
Time Warp by DragonWolfACe Time Warp by DragonWolfACe
Hey...look...The Saint Louisan behind classic Pennsylvania EMD E Units passing a manned tower! It must be 1955!

Nope, Bennett Levans repainted and restored to their original owners and colors pull the overnight "Pittsburgh Excursion" into Altoona during 2007s Altoona Railfest. Alto tower, unlike hundreds of its cousins, remains manned due to this very busy section of the railroad.
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:iconkodimarto:
Kodimarto Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2014   Filmographer
Fantastic photo, mate! :)
Reply
:iconlittlebonnieblue:
LittleBonnieBlue Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2013
Beautiful shot, such a pretty day! I like the paint job, too .. very appealing to the eye!

:chix0r:
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:icondragonwolface:
DragonWolfACe Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks! And yes its a classy paintscheme.
Reply
:iconpanasqueira:
panasqueira Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Nice overview¡¡¡¡
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:iconbelzelga1:
belzelga1 Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2013
I've always wondered if they still have twin 12 cylinder 567s under those shells of if they've been repowered. Am also curious as to weather or not the dynamic brakes have been changed so that each power plant has its own grids or if that too is still like how it was when it left EMD, minus the change to the DB hatch as it is in this shot.
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:iconbixbys:
bixbys Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
A step back in time, indeed.
Reply
:icondinodanthetrainman:
dinodanthetrainman Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
nice
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:iconswiftflyer:
SwiftFlyer Featured By Owner May 1, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Nice to see them in their original colors.
Reply
:iconrailroadnutjob:
RailroadNutjob Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011  Student General Artist
Talk about such a darn classic!

Gonna love 'em good ol' classic diesel trains, as well as them classy ol' steam locomotives!
:)
Reply
:iconsamreevesphoto:
samreevesphoto Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2011  Professional Photographer
Ahhh, E-units.

Nice one!!
Reply
:iconraakone:
Raakone Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2011
Cool picture.
Reply
:icondragonwolface:
DragonWolfACe Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks
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:iconyerfdog5:
Yerfdog5 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2011  Hobbyist Photographer
Great high shot - reminds me of my first model railway
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:iconclockworkaardvark:
ClockworkAardvark Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Hm, I thought it was Big Red. ^u^
Reply
:iconsullivan1985:
sullivan1985 Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
I love Bennet Levans E8's.
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:iconlimitedclear:
LimitedClear Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2010
I was at Railfest 2007 too! As I recall some jerks actually paint balls at these units.
Reply
:icondragonwolface:
DragonWolfACe Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah, I remember that now that you mention it. I think it was on one of runs around the curve, not the run from Pittsburgh. But I do know it wasnt anything major as they where only stopped for a few minutes.
Reply
:iconeyepilot13:
eyepilot13 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
beautiful restoration! Cool angle, I'm partial to roof shots; I haven't posted enough of those.
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:iconfactorone33:
factorone33 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2010  Professional Photographer
Whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa?!
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:iconshenanigan87:
shenanigan87 Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
Great shot, and great locomotives!

Might I ask what those long lines on the roof are? Some kind of radio antenna?
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:icondragonwolface:
DragonWolfACe Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Oh yes, back when design and appearance ment something.

Precisely, they were early forms of radio communication between locomotives, cabooses, and signal towers.

[link]

More info about them. They were distinctly PRR and any late steam engine/early PRR diesel without them, just doesnt look the same. They varied from size depending on where they were applied from steam engine tender, to caboose, to the entire length of a long diesel. I think the length was solely cosmetic.
Reply
:iconshenanigan87:
shenanigan87 Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
I think this here would be the German equivalent of the F series: [link] Not built in huge numbers, as it was only used in Germany (and the Brits built it in license), and not as long lived either, but oh so iconic for 50s era advancements in railroading. The steam heating pipe is almost like an anachronism though, and was one of the reason it didn't live as long as other locomotives. But the most iconic loco of all times here was still this monster [link] The best combination of style and power we ever had... Today's locomotives almost seem to go back to boxes on wheels as far as appearance goes, as the high speed EMUs are the only things that seem to require "styling". And that "styling" sometimes looks like a horrid car crash with a platypus on top.

Ah, that's very interesting! Found another interesting site on that topic: [link] What makes it very unusual is the fact that it wasn't really a radio, but an induction system, to bridge the gap between the train and the lineside wires. I don't think I've seen anything like this, as in the antennae being on the roof. In fact, our LZB [link] also uses the induction method, with the wire between the rails. I was wondering why the Pennsy didn't do that as well. Perhaps the lineside wires were already in place, or perhaps their train protection system (induced signal through the rails) would have disrupted voice communications through nearby wires.
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:icondragonwolface:
DragonWolfACe Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Still kind of ugly if you ask me!

I wonder, how did locomotive design go from...
[link]
[link]
[link]
[link]

To this...
[link]
[link]

Maybe its the same reason that cars of today all basically look the same versus the same era. Essentially built for function rather than making it look good.

Ah yes, KC's PRR site, how could I overlook that. That is one Pennsy fan that actually doesnt like to hoard all the PRR info he knows like most PRR fans.

I think the PRR did it that way because it made them look distintive. Other than that, I wouldnt know.
Reply
:iconshenanigan87:
shenanigan87 Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
I do hope you weren't describing the 103 as ugly. Otherwise, I'll have to come over there and hit you with a stick right now and everything! :P

I guess you already said it, appearance today is more down to function than back then. Cars look more or less like blobs that fell out of the wind tunnel, in order to have a low drag coefficient. Same goes for bullet trains, as well as the odd shape of Japanese trains, in order to avoid shockwaves when running into tunnels. I guess most American diesels don't go fast, so having a sturdy, wedge shaped front end is more straight-forward in terms of crash safety. Plus, it's much simpler and cheaper to make. Best example: Prototype [link] Serial production: [link] Interestingly, the less round one turned out to be more aerodynamic! :XD:
Reply
:icondragonwolface:
DragonWolfACe Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Ohhh, noooo, the 200! The 103 looks quite AWESOME.

The fastest feight trains can go here is 70 MPH and even that is strictly out west in the middle of the desert. The average top speed is generally 55MPH. Which, according to a 1950sish report done by none other than the Pennsy, found that 50-55MPH freight was the fastest most economically speed for a freight train. Any faster and not only do you end up burning more fuel but youll end up tieing the railroad up as freight trains wait for permission into the yard.

This was back when railroads actually tried to run trains in a timely manner. Today, atleast with Norfolk Southern and Conway yard, they will just bring a freight into the yard off the mainline at 10 MPH or less. A decade ago, the same train would go into the yard at 20-30 MPH and make use of one of the yard leads to atleast get the train off the main. I still dont understand it.

Thats an interesting fact between the two...odd...
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:icontimid-wolf:
timid-wolf Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
I love that tower, it is beautiul
Reply
:iconthemightyquinn:
TheMightyQuinn Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
Nice shot!

I presume those are original radio antennas on top?
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:icondragonwolface:
DragonWolfACe Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yes and no. Yes, they are real to life to how the engine was delivered, but no, I dont think those are the original. Here is a picture of the units under Conrail. Note, 4022 is the Erie Lackawanna heritage unit but trailing is one of the former PRR unit.

[link]
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:iconthemightyquinn:
TheMightyQuinn Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
It was a nice touch putting them back on!
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:icondragonwolface:
DragonWolfACe Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
A very nice touch!
Reply
:icontycho-skies:
Tycho-Skies Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2010  Student Traditional Artist
I guess all of the control towers are computerized?

It's been ten years since I knew ANYTHING about trains.
Reply
:icontycho-skies:
Tycho-Skies Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2010  Student Traditional Artist
It's been a very long time since I've seen one of these...

0.0 Altoona? Where the heck do you live, pal? I live within a rock's throw of Altoona.
Reply
:icondragonwolface:
DragonWolfACe Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Altoona is a three hour drive east for me.

Yes, pretty much, instead of one person watching over a single interlocking, one person watches an entire division, lining routes and tracks over dozens of interlockings. Yet, even with this modern computerized way, the railroads where able to run more trains, both passenger and freight, than today.
Reply
:icontycho-skies:
Tycho-Skies Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2010  Student Traditional Artist
HAHA WE GOTTA MEET UP, where are you, farther towards Philly?
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:iconcharukunova:
CharukuNova Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
sweet i love the tower and the pensy units. nice catch.
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:icondragonwolface:
DragonWolfACe Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks, PRR knew how to do things right.
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:iconcharukunova:
CharukuNova Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
so very true. My the PRR live on through those how care enough to preserve it.
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:iconacela:
acela Featured By Owner Dec 1, 2010
Beautiful shot!
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:icondecophoto32:
decophoto32 Featured By Owner Dec 1, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
Awesome E! Very cool color. Classy. I wonder if the guys in the tower still use the fire place.
Reply
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